Greenville Brain Training Notices Link Between Neurofeedback And Peak Performance

July 17, 2019 - /PressAdvantage/ - Greenville Brain Training in Greenville South Carolina is helping their clients achieve peak performance using biomedical engineering. Engineers at Columbia have found that neurofeedback technology can benefit an individual’s mental state and have a significant impact on their overall performance. Using a brain-computer interface (BCI) engineers were able to change a subject's arousal state and improve performance in a demanding sensory motor task. This is truly good news for many people who feel that we are living in a time of ever increasing stress and more competition in the work enviroment.

Greenville Brain Training offers neurofeedback and reports their patients are seeing results. The training is very simple and easy and can actually be done at home. All an individual has to do is sit back, relax and watch a movie of their choice. During the neurofeedback session, the patients’ brain wave activity is monitored through sensors attached to the scalp. The information is then communicated to the patient with visual and auditory signals. What happens is that when the brainwaves are firing at a very slow rate, the images on the screen will dim and the volume will decrease, offering immediate feedback to the brain that something is out of balance.

Dr. JoJo Yonce, one of the doctors at Greenville Brain Training, explains, “This feedback helps you recognize when wanted and unwanted brain waves are being produced, and gradually, you brain learns how to better create the desired brain waves and minimize undesired brain wave patterns. In other words, you’ll watch a movie, while your brain watches its own brain waves and self-corrects the dysfunction.”

A typical neurofeedback peack performance training session lasts for 50 to 60 minutes. This in because in addition to a 30 minute neurofeedback session, some time will be spent beforehand to incorporate some therapies, such as audio visual entrainment, Vielight, EmWave, and galvanic skin response biofeedback. These therapies are designed to relax the brain and help prepare it for the neurofeedback session. The process will not hurt, nor will it be uncomfortable or unpleasant in any way.

According to Dr. JoJo Yonce, neurofeedback results into a balanced brain. This has been found to be helpful for a number of conditions, including ADHD, anxiety or depression, insomnia, dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, migraines, concussions, achieving peak performance, learning challenges, fibromyalgia, and autism. He explains that neurofeedback in a non-invasive method that does not use medication, has no unwanted side effects, and is just as effective as drugs and even better in some cases.

Patients who have already tried neurofeedback from Greenville Brain Training have mostly positive things to say about the method. For instance, Gino T. says, “I went to JoJo because others had raved about his work. I wanted a boost in memory and focus and I got it! It took a minute for me to understand how this treatment works, but then it really makes sense once you begin the process. I highly recommend, and JoJo makes the experience very comfortable.”

Meanwhile, Joy D. says, “My husband has been receiving brain training for a few months with Dr. Green after suffering a tumor on his brain, a traumatic brain injury and a stroke. He was not able to even follow simple task. Today he is able to communicate, drive himself to his sessions, participate in daily activities. The change is unbelievable. The staff, Dr. Green and Dr. Yonce are excellent. They care so much. I was skeptical because I didn’t understand how the brain could re-train itself. They have taken so much time to explain everything! [...] Thank you to everyone with Greenville Brain Training for giving us our lives back!”

Aside from the regular neurofeedback training that they provide at their office, patients can also take advantage of at home neurofeedback, which gives them the freedom to do brain training from the comfort of their home. Those who want to do this will need to undergo a quantitative electroenceophalograph or “brain map” first. Then, they will receive a complete neurofeedback training station. And then halfway through the plan, patients will be invited to go back to the office for a second brain map to assess their progress. There will be a total of 40 sessions that can be done 2 or more times a week.

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For more information about Greenville Brain Training, contact the company here:

Greenville Brain Training
Dr. JoJo Yonce
1-864-370-2225
dryonce@greenvillebraintraining.com
1109 S. Church St. Greenville S.C. 29605

ReleaseID: 60029231

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